Celebrate the 30th Anniversary The Historic Military Defeat of Racist South Africa in Angola

Saturday, April 14, 2018

6:30pm Reception, 7:00pm Program

University Church of Chicago, 5655 S. University Ave, Chicago 60637

Celebrate the 30th Anniversary

The Historic Military Defeat of Racist

South Africa in Angola

Nothing beats Cuba’s historic role in defeating apartheid South Africa’s army in Angola: some 450,000 Cubans volunteered to join that 15-year effort (over 2,000 of whom lost their lives).

Nelson Mandela– visiting Cuba first after his liberation from prison– put it like this:  “What other country has such a history of selfless behavior as Cuba has shown for the people of Africa?”
Please join us to learn more about and celebrate this historic event – and to support and send off the 10 Chicagoland folks going to Cuba as part of the International May Day Brigade.
featuring:

• ‘Cuba in Africa – the Untold Story’ [video, 12 minutes]

• Prexy Nesbitt {central U.S. anti-apartheid leader/representative of

Mozambique’s FRELIMO liberation movement, worked with the ANC and Cuba];

• Dr. Piero Gleijeses (Johns Hopkins Advanced institute of International Studies,

world’s foremost authority on Cuba’s role in Africa) appearing via Skype;

• Two U.S. youth joining the International May Day Brigade

$5 donation requested / no-one turned away for lack of funds

Sponsored by The Chicago Cuba Coalition http://www.facebook.com/chicubasolidarity/

 

https://chicagocubacoalition.com/

chicubacoalition@gmail.com

Celebrate the 30th Anniversary The Historic Military Defeat of Racist South Africa in Angol

Saturday, April 14, 2018

6:30pm Reception, 7:00pm Program

University Church of Chicago, 5655 S. University Ave, Chicago 60637

Celebrate the 30th Anniversary

The Historic Military Defeat of Racist

South Africa in Angola

Nothing beats Cuba’s historic role in defeating apartheid South Africa’s army in Angola: some 450,000 Cubans volunteered to join that 15-year effort (over 2,000 of whom lost their lives).

Nelson Mandela– visiting Cuba first after his liberation from prison– put it like this:  “What other country has such a history of selfless behavior as Cuba has shown for the people of Africa?”
Please join us to learn more about and celebrate this historic event – and to support and send off the 10 Chicagoland folks going to Cuba as part of the International May Day Brigade.
featuring:

• ‘Cuba in Africa – the Untold Story’ [video, 12 minutes]

• Prexy Nesbitt {central U.S. anti-apartheid leader/representative of

Mozambique’s FRELIMO liberation movement, worked with the ANC and Cuba];

• Dr. Piero Gleijeses (Johns Hopkins Advanced institute of International Studies,

world’s foremost authority on Cuba’s role in Africa) appearing via Skype;

• Two U.S. youth joining the International May Day Brigade

$5 donation requested / no-one turned away for lack of funds

Sponsored by The Chicago Cuba Coalition http://www.facebook.com/chicubasolidarity/

https://chicagocubacoalition.com/

chicubacoalition@gmail.com

Celebration of the 60th Anniversary of the Cuban Revolution

Please join the Chicago Cuba Coalition in celebration of the 60th anniversary of the Cuban revolution. On January 1, 1959 the Cuban people took revolutionary power and they began the construction of socialism that would have profound impact throughout the world. Nationally, Cuba has eliminated illiteracy and raised health care standards. Internationally, Cuba has remained true to its humanitarian and anti-imperialist principles. Cuban troops supported liberation forces in Angola and were decisive in the defeat of apartheid South Africa in 1975. Responding to a call by the World Health Organization, Cuba sent health care workers to West Africa to fight against the ebola epidemic. And in 1999, Cuba established the Latin American School of Medicine, where tens of thousands of young people have received scholarships and graduated as physicians with the only expectation that each person return to their home country to serve impoverished communities. As Fidel Castro explained on May 1, 2000, the Cuban Revolution “means fighting for our dreams of justice for Cuba and the world, which is the foundation of our patriotism, our socialism and our internationalism”.

So on this historic anniversary, we celebrate and salute Cuba and  the revolutionary process. Cuba is a shining example of the potential to organize society based on humanitarian principles. Come join the discussion.

SATURDAY, JAN 26TH
Program begins at 7 pm and includes; 

  • Miguel Fraga, the 1st Secretary of the Cuban Embassy
  • Local solidarity activists who will share information on the brigades that are being organized in 2019
  • Kuumba Lynx, cultural performance inspired by trip to Cuba
    http://www.kuumbalynx.com/
  • Digital photo display of previous brigades

Dinner at 6 pm
$10 donation requested, no one turned away for lack of funds

Location: SEIU Union hall, 2229 S Halsted Street, Chicago
(parking available behind the building)

Upcoming Events

With Our Memory on the Future

IN CELEBRATION OF INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY,
YOU ARE INVITED TO A SCREENING OF THE DOCUMENTARY FILM, WITH OUR MEMORY ON THE FUTURE
PRODUCED BY THE FEDERATION OF CUBAN WOMEN.
IN CELEBRATION OF INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY,

Date: Sunday March 10, 2019
Time: 4 PM movie screening, presentation and discussion to follow movie
Place: 2229 S Halsted St (parking available in the back)

This documentary was produced in 2005 by the Federation of Cuban Women (FMC) on the 45th anniversary of its founding. The film examines the progress women in Cuba have made since the workers and farmers of that country took power in 1959 and through subsequent advances in that country’s socialist revolution. Through interviews with women and men and with girls and boys on the streets, in the workplace, and in the schoolyards, the attitudes towards women’s equality on the job, sexual mores, divorce, child rearing, and other questions in Cuba today are frankly discussed. Leaders of the FMC describe the role of Cuba’s revolutionary government in fighting for and defending women’s rights over the last five decades. In Spanish, with English subtitles.

NOTE: DEADLINE APPLICATION FOR MAY DAY BRIGADE IS MARCH 15TH, FULL PAYMENT OF $650 IS DUE MARCH 22ND. INFO ON MAY DAY, VENCEREMOS AND IFCO BRIGADES WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THIS EVENT

 

Statement by Cuba’s President, Raul Castro on Hurricane Irma

Hurricane Irma, with its destructive power, battered our island for 72 hours, beginning the morning of September 8 until this Sunday afternoon. With winds that surpassed 250 kilometers per hour on occasion, it crossed the north of the country from Baracoa – hit hard by another phenomenon of this type almost a year ago – to the outskirts of Cárdenas. However, given its immense size, practically no province was spared its effects.

Described by experts as the largest ever to form in the Atlantic, this meteorological phenomenon caused severe damage to the country, which, precisely because of its scope, has yet to be quantified. A preliminary view shows evidence of an impact on housing, the electrical system, and agriculture.

It also struck some of our principal tourist destinations, but damage will be repaired before the beginning of the high season. We have on hand for this the human resources and materials needed, given that this constitutes one of the principal sources of income in the national economy.

These have been difficult days for our people, who, in a few hours time, have seen what was constructed with great effort hit by a devastating hurricane. Images from the last few hours speak for themselves, as does the spirit of resistance and victory of our people that is regenerated with every adversity.

In these difficult circumstances, the unity of Cubans has prevailed, the solidarity among neighbors, discipline in response to instructions issued by the National Civil Defense General Staff and Defense Councils at all levels, the professionalism of specialists at the Institute of Meteorology, the immediacy of our communications media and its journalists, the support of mass organizations, as well as the cohesion of National Defense Council leadership bodies. Special mention for all of our women, including leaders of the Party and government, who with aplomb and maturity provided leadership and confronted the difficult situation.

The days that are coming will be ones of much work, during which the strength and indestructible confidence in the Revolution of Cubans will again be demonstrated. This is not a time to mourn, but to construct again that which the winds of Irma attempted to destroy.

With organization, discipline, and the coordination of all our structures, we will move forward as we have done on previous occasions. No one should be fooled; the task we have before us is huge, but with a people like ours, we will win the most important battle: recovery.

At this critical moment, the Cuban Workers’ Federation and the National Association of Small Farmers, along with all other mass organizations, must redouble efforts to eliminate as quickly as possible the trail left by this destructive event.

One principle remains immovable: the Revolution will leave no one unprotected and measures are already being adopted to ensure that no Cuban family is left to their fate.

As has been customary every time a meteorological phenomenon has struck us, there have been many expressions of solidarity received from all parts of the world. Heads of state and government, political organizations, and friends in solidarity organizations have expressed the desire to help us, who we thank in the name of more than eleven million Cuban men and women.

We face the recovery with the example of Comandante en Jefe de la Revolución Cubana, Fidel Castro Ruz, who, with his unwavering confidence in victory and iron will, taught us that nothing is impossible. In these difficult hours, his legacy makes us strong and unites us.

Raúl Castro Ruz

On Hurricane Irma – Aid List directly from Cuba

On Hurricane Irma hitting Cuba

For us in Chicago we need to discuss what to do now / how we can help – and we are meeting this Sunday, September 17th at 1:30pm at 1325 S. Wabash

Everyone and all are invited to this open meeting to organize aid for Cuba as well as to discuss how utilize the upcoming Int’l Che Brigade that’ll arrive in Cuba October 1st (and include voluntary labor to aid our Cuban hosts/ brothers and sisters).

Here’s hoping that the many organizations and individual friends of Cuba will all come together to organize a major fundraising event for hurricane relief (and i bet our majorly-happening/esteemed friend Marguerite Horberg, CEO of HotHouse might have some ideas/resources) as will many of the rest of us.

The Canadian National Network on Cuba and the UK Cuba Solidarity Campaign are currently organizing fundraising / accepting contributions; we are awaiting replies from both about how U.S. people might contribute to those funds – or if our own Nat’l Network on Cuba will be collecting funds here in the U.S.

Meanwhile please see below the list sent to us by ICAP directly from Cuba for aid:
More than 1 of any item is welcome and needed –

-Multi Directional Flat HDTV Antenna

-Toner-Brother TN-630/TN-660

-Toner- HP LaserJet P1102w

-USB Flash Drives

-Multiple port USB hubs

-External hard drives

-Used laptops and cell phones

-Office materials (pens, highlighters, sticky notes, notebooks, etc.)

There is also an Amazon wish list for some of the items in case people are unclear. The link to it is below

https://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wishlist/1DGT2DZU7F382/ref=cm_sw_em_r_d_g__w

On the other hand, if you want to do other donations, we suggest disposable materials & school materials, items for work in the field such as gloves, etc.

Contact us if there are any questions or concerns!

Note from Bob Guild, Vice President of Marazul, US Based Travel Agency to Cuba

September 11, 2017 – 8:00 AM

Note from Bob Guild, Vice President of Marazul, US Based Travel Agency that has helped Chicago Cuba Coalition immensely in organizing numerous trips to Cuba and is also facilitating the Int’l Che Brigade coming up Oct 1st- Oct 15th 2017 has shared:

“As you know, the northern coast of Cuba was extremely hard hit by the hurricane. Because Irma turned north later than predicted, Havana was also hit harder than expected with flooding and wind damage. As you also know, Cuba’s advance preparation for these natural disasters is the best in the world. And, as you probably also know, they have in solidarity already sent hundreds of health care professionals to the other Caribbean islands devastated by Irma.

Sections of Havana are still flooded, electricity is still out in many sections, and we do not know how soon our friends can get back to their offices and in some cases their homes.

We have already received inquiries from participants in the Che Brigade about the status of the contingent. We do not expect any cancellation or postponement. But of course, we need to wait to hear back from ICAP and Amistur.”

Cuba Through The Eyes of A Ghetto Pearl

Writer’s explanation of the picture: Above is my favorite picture. While we were at CIJAM waiting for our buses, Jonathan and I went out back and I was drawn to this village of trees. I fell in love with them. I didn’t know what they were called but I found out while watching Geoffrey Baers wee in Havana. It is a Ceiba Tree. When my ancestors were brought from Africa to Cuba they held these tress in a high a sacred regard because they reminded them of the BoaBoad trees.

My journey to Cuba was a spiritually uplifting one that I will never forget. Far too many wonderful things transpired and I can only capture these moments for you. And know that all though there were very high points, there were some low points as well.

Cuba was beautiful to me. It was very reminiscent of the summers I spent between Mississippi and Louisiana as a girl. The preservation of culture, the hospitality, the music, dancing and the strong sense of pride and resilience.

The highest point was the day I was asked to speak at the International Meeting on Solidarity with Cuba. Following the conference we had lunch and I a post card by Gerardo Hernandez of the Cuban 5 and it read “we continue United in the battle for a better world of equality, justice and peace.

The low point was the tension that arose during the planning for International Night around the singing of the Black National Anthem. Although it ended up being a success with the majority of the group for the U.S. singing We Shall Over Come, and that night we did. It showed me that no matter what our collective intentions are, we still have racial biases, whether conscious or unconscious and the inability to effectively communicate on issues involving race. There were some tensions or differences among other countries as well notably Brazil and Europe.

I hope to go back to Cuba more knowledgeable about it’s political climate and its revolutionary brilliance. I am taking a Spanish class at the YWCA and I have given some serious thought to International night. BBQ and Revolutionary music.

I met so many awesome people from cities throughout the U.S. as well as other countries.  I even met someone at the conference that put me in contact with a retired professor here in the states at the University of Illinois and he has written several books on Cuba and I am reading them and pulling in his knowledge.

Cuba Through The Eyes of A Ghetto Pearl. Viva la 🇨🇺❣️

26th of July

Thank you all for attending!

Report : 65 people attended!

Many positives came out of this event, first of all the strong participation from the Puerto Rican Cultural Center (PRCC) and the National Boricua Human Rights Network, Chicago Chapter – nine sisters and brothers from these orgs in total solidarity with the struggle against Washington’s colonization of and austerity war against Cuba’s sister island!

We also had the surprise honor of central Puerto Rican community leader Jose Lopez speaking– plus his bringing a Cuban speaker from Cenesex (the Mariela Castro-led LBGT and sex education advocacy group).

Also a broad range of other speakers starting with Gisela Lopez, historic member of the July 26th movement from before the Cuban Revolution’s triumph, Manuel Tempori from Consulado de Venezuela en Chicago, Marguerito Diaz, Workers United, an SEIU affiliate elected official, Zakiyah Muhammad (SEIU worker), Tom Hansen from Mexico Solidarity Network, two brigadistas from our 12th Cuba May Day trip, and Jeffrey Sarles of the Chicago Workers World Party

Many notable guests present including Prexy Nesbitt, Columbia students/performers Andrea and Courtney, and the president of One Heart for Africa. Also, 2 revolutionary former Puerto-Rican political prisoners and leading Chicago human rights attorney Jan Susler!

Last, but not least, thanks to Rosalyn and Ralph for amazing Cuban food, Sally Cattouse’s photography and Steve Eckardt, the Chicago Cuba Coalition Coordinator!

Hopefully not forgetting anyone, thanks to all organizations and everyone who participated in solidarity and volunteered to help out!

 

Cuba is a very interesting country. It is a 3rd word country right, so when you think of a 3rd world country—for example, like Pakistan, where I was born and raised for some part of my life–there you will see poverty, illiteracy, lack of health care–you see naked children on the street begging for food/money with no shelter, and streets are smelly/dirty. So, when I was thinking of a 3rd world country, I was thinking of things like that, but when you go to Cuba, another 3rd world country—it’s very different than most 3rd world countries, it is the total opposite.

Cuba is independent of capitalist domination and you see no homelessness there, literacy rate is 99.7% (higher than rich 1st countries in the world), Cuba has one of the best healthcare systems in the world (better than rich 1st world countries) and the streets seemed clean for a 3rd world country.

When we first arrived at the airport in Cuba, the first thing that caught my attention was the airport workers were women-dominant—that being black and brown women— even as we walked around the provinces in Cuba, I saw majority of women coming from work in their uniforms. Especially in my personal experience working in IT in the U.S. with white-male dominance, it felt unusual, but Cuba really showed that gender equality is something that is reachable as a society. I also noticed outside on the streets that the police did not carry as many weapons at all compared to the U.S. police–living in Chicago, I see the police here go around the city with so many weapons like we are in some war zone.

In Cuba, Women constitute 48% of employees in state institutions or national assembly, exceed 70% of the workforce in sectors such as education, health and the administration of justice, and make up almost half of the Parliament.

We listened to Fernando González in the middle of the picture above on mic—he inspired me—his bravery–even after being locked up for 14 years in the U.S., as soon as he got out—he went back to his revolutionary activities—spreading the word of Socialism and fighting for liberation. Fernando also became the Vice President of ICAP (Cuban Institute of Friendship with Peoples–the organization that holds these international brigades to invite the world to learn about Cuba and Socialism) in May 2014, three months after being released from a U.S. jail.

Another person that was inspiring at the brigade was one of our tour guides, he was a sniper at the war in Angola in 1978 when he was 18 years old and showed us pictures of him in Angola. He explained in depth why he decided to join the war in Angola and that he was doing it for the liberation of the peoples. Compared to people who go to war from the U.S.—do not have a deep understanding of why they are going to war and fighting in other countries (the U.S. wars also have nothing to do with the liberation of the peoples).

We also farmed with Cuban farmers. One of the Cuban farmers that we helped, showed us her house (picture on left). She had a picture of Fidel Castro up on the wall. You can tell that the Cuban’s really honor their revolutionary leaders. The farmer also told us that the land was provided to her by the state for free to grow mango trees—we helped her remove rocks from the land, it was very hard work! I just moved 3 rocks and I was exhausted—I felt like i was done for the day, when I had 4 more hours to go, but here is this Cuban farmer with her husband and her daughter who work on the whole farm all by themselves.

The farmer also pointed out how they can’t use some farming techniques and have to use old machines from the Soviet Union that they reinvent the parts of–to keep the machinery functioning and this is all because of the blockade, they can’t import modern machinery–if the blockade was lifted, it can solve a lot of their farming issues.

Many individuals own their own houses and small farms. It’s not absentee ownership, if you own it, you either live on it or work on it, but it is all rent-free. It was also mentioned that there is a continuing housing shortage in Cuba. The building material shortages are because of the blockade, but Cubans are still able to have no homeless people, unlike the U.S., we have abundance of high rises and houses, but still have countless homeless people on the streets. Cubans are very politically aware and vocalize that the issues are because of the US blockade.

You also see a lot of private run cafe’s or restaurants at people’s homes as you walk around (above)

One great experience in Cuba was when we were walking around on the streets–one Cuban, who was also a farmer invited us to his house to play dominoes and drink coffee (above)—that was a fun time.

Something else that was interesting–I saw a church (above left) and a mosque (above right) while walking around. I personally didn’t see a lot of people being very religious or going to Sunday masses or anything, but there are spaces there for people to go to—they still have freedom to practice any religion in a socialist society.

We also visited the Presidential Palace of all the Cuban presidents till Batista, which is now a museum—it became a museum after the Cuban Revolution (Museum of the Revolution). It contained exhibits on the history of Cuban struggles from the 15th century to the present. The museum contained equipment used by Che and Castro, for example, SAU-100 tank used by Castro during the 1961 battle of the Bay of Pigs. Also, the Granma boat was displayed that carried Fidel Castro and 81 other revolutionaries from Mexico to Cuba in December 1956 to launch the Revolution. There were displays of uniforms that had blood-stains and bullet holes, which people wore during revolutionary wars against Batista, it also contained displays of planes, vehicles and weapons used during the Revolutionary wars against Batista and in the Bay of Pigs.

You also see bullet holes around the museum from 1957 (in the above pictures) when the University Students Federation attempted to assassinate Batista. This museum gave me the chills, it really hit home on how real the struggle for socialism was. It showed that to get rid of capitalism and to have a society that workers control is something that we as people will have to get together in solidarity and fight for.

There was also this one satirical display in the Museum of the Revolution (above) with caricatures of Batista and the U.S. Presidents, thanking each President for making Socialism strong in Cuba.

We also attended May Day in Havana at Plaza de la Revolucion. In Havana, there were near 1 million Cubans marching and over 6 million in all of Cuba. It was really interesting and also very nice to see that the police/security at the May Day were not wearing their uniforms and I did not see any weapons on them, they blended in with the people on May Day.

On the left are shots from the Cuban International Workers’ Day on May 1st (see security/police in top image wearing regular clothes and no weapons on them).

 

 

Translation from some of the posters and chants of the Cuban people on May Day were:
“Long live the workers of Cuba and the world”
“Long live Fidel and Raul”
“Long live the Cuban Revolution”

Translation of banner above: “Unity is our Strength” (this was when the march was just beginning).

 

We also saw Raúl Castro (left) come out and wave at the Cuban crowd on May Day! @ Plaza de la Revolución—It was interesting because he did not speak at all to the crowd and I thought he would, but this is because May Day is about the workers and the people.

 

Also, another very inspiring moment was when all the Cubans on the streets marching sang The Internationale (left-wing anthem) on May Day (video above).

We visited a medical college in Cienfuegos. There the director of the college told us how the Cuban people are proud of the fact that they have trained thousands of doctors from all over the world (med students from different countries—in image above–top right).

Studying in Cuba is all free and going to any doctor is free too. Cuba has abundance of doctors, you can find a doctor in every neighborhood block, the Cuban doctor was explaining how the doctors know their neighbors families and see their children grow, so families usually just go to their neighborhood doctor who becomes their family friend. Doctors are also paid less than farmers currently, they explained that this is because since education is free, everyone wants to become an doctor, but Cuba needs more people in farming, so the salary is higher to get more people to do farming (good example of how people are not greedy as usually capitalist society’s argue that people are naturally greedy and want money, but here in Cuba, people are more oriented towards putting people first, not profit)

If you read about Cuba, you will learn quickly that Cuba has one of the best health-care systems in the world even with the blockade, but the blockade still gives them a lot of issues. Such as the doctor explained how some of their medical technologies are not present in all the hospitals around the island because of the blockade the technology import is limited. So, if a person needs a specific test, it can take days and it can be life-threatening sometimes to wait for some patients. I mean think about how much Cuba can do if the blockade was lifted! Cuba wants to share their innovative methods with rest of the world (such as lung cancer vaccine, medicine for diabetes etc) but U.S. wont allow it with the blockade, its ridiculous!

We also visited a university where students from all over the world were studying there and had displayed their countries culture for us—such as, Panama, Sierra Leone—other countries from Africa, Caribbean etc (in above image on bottom right).

I also got sick in Cuba, some type of an allergic reaction and went to the local doctor. Before the doctor did anything, he made me talk to 3 different workers to let them translate to him on what I am saying so there is no misinformation transferred during the language translation. It was such a quick, painless experience, the doctor just handed the medicine and I left–all free, no money or insurance involved. The doctor also told me to come see him the next 2 days after to make sure i am recovering, and again no money involved and the medicine did fix me. The doctor also told me not to work for the next 2 days just to be 100% sure I recover, even though I felt fine. In the United States, when I get sick during work–I can’t even take a day off work easily and I am also hesitant to go to the doctor, that is the last option for most people in the United States–to go see a doctor because how expensive it can be and how much extra work will come with it–the insurance papers, its just another headache to deal with that. There has been countless times where I have been to work sick and could not take off because work is so demanding–since I work in tech consulting, I also sometimes fly to a different state to work at a client site and I have flown sick with a flu and went into the office right after I landed, it was a horrible torturous experience, but in Cuba, it is nothing like that–people and their health are first!

We visited a Cooperative Production Center in Artemisa (above). Workers there told us that the workers control production. They have monthly mass meetings where they make a plan for the month and elect managers. The workers also take turns to do each different position because doing the same routine can cause repetitive injuries, so to avoid any injuries from repetition of hand work, they change positions, there is also no pressure in doing work quickly!

We were invited to a neighborhood meeting in Cienfuegos held by the members of the Committees for the Defense of the Revolution (CDR)—the homes in this neighborhood were built by the help of Venezuela in 2006. The Cubans in the neighborhood held a block party for us and served us desserts and fruits, also held performances for us.

It was really cool to meet the members of CDR. There are 8.4 million Cubans of the 11.2 million national population registered as CDR members—this shows that if more than half the Cuban population are members of CDR, then people themselves are in control of their own communities. The numbers also show that CDR is obviously not some secret police like the U.S. government implies if way over half the Cuban population is the CDR. CDR is to keep an eye on and condemn people who want to exploit others or spread any acts of racism and sexism (this includes everyone, no matter who you are, even if you are the police), that is what the CDR is trying to stop in their communities and protect people from. CDR is to be democratic, it is for communities to vote and voice their concerns.

Lastly, one random thing I noticed was when we first arrived to the camp that we were all staying at in Cuba—we were introduced to every single worker (doctor, cleaning person, dining services, IT woman and etc), they honor all their workers. Also, at the camp–at night there would be communal gatherings and dancing, so I always saw the doctor hanging out with the bathroom cleaning worker. You would never see that in the U.S. because of the class differences and how we are all divided by where we can afford to live. Sadly, this is something that we have to notice or see as something as so different when we go to Cuba because of the capitalist societies we are from when it shouldn’t be like that. With the Cubans, there is no weird ego or competitive personality, no one is in a rat race or trying to prove to others they are more successful, better, happier than the rest. They are all just living in solidarity and dignity. Also, Cubans are always listening to music and dancing, so you definitely can’t avoid that when you go there!

Cuba is not a perfect heaven, but notice what Cuba as a 3rd world socialist country has done for its people (and keeps fighting for its people) and know how Cuba was before the Revolution when it was under imperialist-capitalist control like most of other 3rd world countries are under right now. Cuba puts its people first, not profit, and wants the same for rest of the countries. Cuba has accomplished so much (such as in the healthcare area) even with the U.S. blockade for 55 years. Learning about Cuba’s history and where it is now, also visiting Cuba has really shown what a remarkable place it is.

Check out a short article explaining why Cuba has a blockade (as Cubans call it) and not an embargo (as U.S. media implies) here